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  • WJPPS NOVEMBER ISSUE PUBLISHED
  • NOVEMBER 2020 Issue has been successfully launched on 1 November 2020

Abstract

THE USE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED MOSQUITOES TO FIGHT DENGUE IN BRAZIL

Célio de Jesus*, Thiago Maciel, Rathna Daisy.

ABSTRACT

Mosquito-borne diseases are one of the major barriers preventing economic progress in the developing world. According to the World Health Organization, 200 million people were victims of malaria in 2010 and 655,000, mostly children, died from it. Dengue fever is believed to affect 50-100 million people per year and results in around 20,000 deaths. Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne, human viral disease in many tropical and sub-tropical areas. In Brazil the disease has been essentially described in the form of case series. Despite the presence of dengue in Brazil since the early 1981s, dengue has become a major public health issue, with a high morbidity and mortality. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are the vectors responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). The genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes being used in these field experiments and cited alternative methods for dengue control. This technology and its impact to the environment studies have focused on controlling the mosquito populations by genetically modifying the insects. Tactics to protect people in endemic areas such as stopping mosquito bites using insecticides, net and repellents, developing preventive drugs and health education to manage mosquito-borne diseases have not shown full effectiveness.

Keywords: Dengue fever, Aedes aegypti, Genetically modified mosquitoes, Brazil.


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